MentorUp’s Code of Conduct for Mentees

As a participating Mentee in the MentorUp Program, I agree to abide by the MentorUp Code of Conduct for Mentees. I agree that if I violate any rule of the MentorUp Code of Conduct for Mentees, MentorUp may suspend or terminate my participation as a Mentee in the MentorUp Program.

Rule 1. Confidentiality.

Except as provided below, I shall not disclose to any third party any personal details of my communications with my Mentor without prior permission of my Mentor. Exception: Code Violations. If my Mentor violates the MentorUp Code of Conduct for Mentors, I shall report the code violations to MentorUp leadership at conduct@mentorup.dev.

Rule 2. Availability.

Ideally, I shall try to be available to communicate with my Mentor at least one time per month. If the Mentee will be temporarily unavailable for a short period (for example, to study for exams), the Mentee should notify the Mentor in advance. The Mentor is reserving time to participate in a mentorship. The Mentor’s time is wasted if the Mentee does not also reserve time to participate in the mentorship.

Rule 3. Communications.

In my communications with my Mentor, (1) I shall not use offensive language, and (2) I shall not transmit offensive images. Offensive language includes, but is not limited to, (a) profanity or verbal abuse directed towards the Mentor, (b) sexually suggestive comments directed towards the Mentor, and (c) derogatory remarks directed towards any individual or group of individuals based on religion, race, color, ethnicity, country of origin, age, gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, or sexual identity. Offensive images include, but are not limited to, (a) images that are sexually suggestive, lewd, or pornographic and (b) images that include offensive language, as described above. Communications refers to communications via any media; for example, in-person, phone, mail, photographs, voice-mail, audio conferencing, video conferencing, audio recordings, video recordings, e-mail, electronic text messaging, computer files supplied on physical media, and computer files transferred electronically.

Rule 4. Topics for Discussion.

If my Mentor expresses unwillingness, reluctance, or discomfort in discussing any topic that I have raised, I shall promptly cease pursuing that topic. The specific personal issues and the degree of personal detail that are appropriate for discussion will depend strongly on the specific Mentor, the specific Mentee, and the specific circumstances. Therefore, MentorUp does not provide a comprehensive list of appropriate and inappropriate topics and does not provide guidance on the degree of personal detail to be shared: The Mentor and the Mentee should agree on the topics that they are comfortable discussing and on the degree of personal details that they are comfortable sharing. The Mentee, for example, may appropriately initiate discussion of personal topics such as problems with family and friends, religion, and death. The Mentee should, however, approach such topics cautiously and ask the Mentor whether the Mentor wishes to pursue such topics. If the Mentor expresses unwillingness, reluctance, or discomfort in discussing a specific topic, the Mentee shall promptly cease pursuing that specific topic.

Rule 5. Relationships.

I shall not pursue a romantic or sexual relationship with my Mentor.

Rule 6. Meetings in Person.

If my Mentor does not wish to meet in person, I shall not insist on a meeting. If circumstances permit, in-person meetings between the Mentor and the Mentee can be beneficial for developing personal rapport, and the Mentee can often benefit from visiting the Mentor’s workplace. It is appropriate for the Mentee to invite the Mentor to meet in person; but, if the Mentor does not wish to meet in person, then the Mentee shall not insist on a meeting. Additionally, some employers have restrictions on visitors to the workplace.

Rule 7. Prohibited Advice.

I shall not seek medical, mental-health, or legal advice from my Mentor. Medical, mental-health, or legal advice should be provided by a qualified professional. Even if the Mentor is coincidentally a qualified professional (for example, if the Mentor is a physician, psychologist, or attorney), the Mentee shall not solicit the Mentor for medical, mental-health, or legal advice: Within the MentorUp Program, the Mentor provides guidance for the academic and professional development of the Mentee. The Mentee should seek the assistance of another qualified professional.

Rule 8. Financial Assistance.

I shall not ask my Mentor for financial assistance. In general, the Mentor should avoid giving money to the Mentee. In specific circumstances, the Mentor may volunteer to give money to the Mentee (for example, to assist the Mentee in paying fees for attending a conference). Under no circumstances, however, is it appropriate for the Mentee to ask the Mentor for financial assistance.

Rule 9. Career Assistance.

I shall not expect my Mentor to find me a job. Under specific circumstances, the Mentor may volunteer to circulate the Mentee’s resume among the Mentor’s colleagues and to inquire whether there is a suitable job opening; however, such assistance is strictly at the discretion of the Mentor, and the Mentee shall not expect, or demand, that the Mentor perform such actions as a requirement of the mentorship.

Rule 10. Report Code Violations.

If I observe any participant behaving in a manner that violates the MentorUp Code of Conduct for Mentors or the MentorUp Code of Conduct for Mentees, I shall promptly report my observations to MentorUp staff at conduct@mentorup.dev.

MentorUp’s Code of Conduct for Mentors

As a participating Mentor in the MentorUp Program, I agree to abide by the MentorUp Code of Conduct for Mentors. I agree that if I violate any rule of the MentorUp Code of Conduct for Mentors, MentorUp may suspend or terminate my participation as a Mentor in the MentorUp Program.

Rule 1. Confidentiality.

Except as provided below, I shall not disclose to any third party any personal details of my communications with my Mentee without prior permission of my Mentee. Exceptions–If my Mentee violates the MentorUp Code of Conduct for Mentees, I shall report the code violations to MentorUp leadership using the email address conduct@mentorup.dev.

Rule 2. Availability.

Ideally, mentors should plan to communicate with their Mentee a minimum of one time per month. A Mentee/Mentor relationship can last as long as the Mentor and Mentee wish to continue. If the Mentor cannot commit sufficient time to fulfill the Mentee’s needs, the Mentor should notify MentorUp so that MentorUp can try to match the Mentee with another Mentor.

Rule 3.

Communications. In my communications with my Mentee, (1) I shall not use offensive language, and (2) I shall not transmit offensive images. Offensive language includes, but is not limited to, (a) profanity or verbal abuse directed towards the Mentee, (b) sexually suggestive comments directed towards the Mentee, and (c) derogatory remarks directed towards any individual or group of individuals based on religion, race, color, ethnicity, country of origin, age, gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, or sexual identity. Offensive images include, but are not limited to, (a) images that are sexually suggestive, lewd, or pornographic and (b) images that include offensive language, as described above. Communications refers to communications via any media; for example, in-person, phone, mail, photographs, voice-mail, audio conferencing, video conferencing, audio recordings, video recordings, e-mail, electronic text messaging, computer files supplied on physical media, and computer files transferred electronically.

Rule 4.

Topics for Discussion. If my Mentee expresses unwillingness, reluctance, or discomfort in discussing any topic that I have raised, I shall promptly cease pursuing that topic. The specific personal issues and the degree of personal detail that are appropriate for discussion will depend strongly on the specific Mentor, the specific Mentee, and the specific circumstances. Therefore, MentorUp does not provide a comprehensive list of appropriate and inappropriate topics and does not provide guidance on the degree of personal detail to be shared; the Mentor and the Mentee should agree on the topics that they are comfortable discussing and on the degree of personal details that they are comfortable sharing. The Mentor, for example, may appropriately initiate discussion of personal topics such as problems with family and friends, religion, and death. The Mentor should, however, approach such topics cautiously and ask the Mentee whether the Mentee wishes to pursue such topics. If the Mentee expresses unwillingness, reluctance, or discomfort in discussing a specific topic, the Mentor shall promptly cease pursuing that specific topic.

Rule 5. Relationships.

I shall not pursue a romantic or sexual relationship with my Mentee. I shall not pursue a business relationship with my Mentee in which my Mentee derives no benefit from the business relationship. An internship, paid or unpaid, can provide valuable experience for the Mentee. If the internship is paid, then the Mentee obviously derives a financial benefit. If the internship is unpaid, then the internship is appropriate only if the Mentee acquires valuable experience or new skills; for example, if the Mentor is providing guidance, training, and review. If the internship is unpaid, then the internship is not appropriate if the Mentee is only performing a service for the Mentor or other party (such as a sponsor). For example, if the Mentee is a skilled programmer and the Mentor requires the services of a skilled programmer, the Mentor shall not request the Mentee to provide programming services without compensation.

Rule 6. Meetings in Person.

If my Mentee does not wish to meet in person, I shall not insist on a meeting. If circumstances permit, in-person meetings between the Mentor and the Mentee can be beneficial for developing personal rapport, and the Mentee can often benefit from visiting the Mentor’s workplace. It is appropriate for the Mentor to invite the Mentee to meet in person; but, if the Mentee does not wish to meet in person, then the Mentor shall not insist on a meeting.

Rule 7. Prohibited Advice.

I shall not provide medical, mental-health, or legal advice to my Mentee. Medical, mental-health, or legal advice should be provided by a qualified professional. Even if the Mentor is coincidentally a qualified professional (for example, if the Mentor is a physician, psychologist, or attorney), the Mentor shall not provide medical, mental-health, or legal advice to the Mentee; within the MentorUp Program, the Mentor provides guidance for the academic and professional development of the Mentee. The Mentor should advise the Mentee to seek the assistance of another qualified professional.

Rule 8. Knowledgeable Advice.

I shall provide advice only on topics about which I have knowledge. Mentors shall refrain from providing advice on topics about which they have little or no knowledge. Incorrect advice can have detrimental consequences.

Rule 9. Fees.

I shall not charge my Mentee any fees during the period of our mentorship. The Mentor is a volunteer and shall not charge a fee for serving as a mentor. Even if the Mentor is employed such that the Mentor normally charges fees for services related to mentorship (for example, if the Mentor is a professional career coach who normally charges fees for preparing resumes), the Mentor shall not charge the Mentee any fees during the period of mentorship.

Rule 11. Report Code Violations.

If I observe any Participant behaving in a manner that violates the MentorUp Code of Conduct for Mentors or the MentorUp Code of Conduct for Mentees, I shall promptly report my observations to MentorUp staff at conduct@mentorup.dev.

Credit

These codes of conduct are derivatives of those written by MentorNet Thank you to the MentorNet organization for creating such thoughtful codes of conduct.